Paul Helmick https://www.paulhelmick.com Experienced Technology Entrepreneur Sat, 09 May 2020 16:55:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.1 https://i1.wp.com/www.paulhelmick.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/cropped-twitterpaul.jpg?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Paul Helmick https://www.paulhelmick.com 32 32 18415141 8 Essential Project Management Skills for Productive Work https://www.paulhelmick.com/8-essential-project-management-skills-for-productive-work/ Sat, 09 May 2020 16:55:38 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40712 8 Essential Project Management Skills for Productive Work

Every project manager has their strengths and weaknesses and to be genuinely productive, you must have a blend of project management skills that are adaptable and ready for any situation.

  • This article touches on 8 that really make or break your projects
  • Planning, Adaptability and Problem Solving
  • Communication, Openness to Learning and Risk Awareness
  • and lastly, Commercial Awareness and Facilitation
  • The article below shares deeper insight into each of these skills.

-> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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Every project manager has their strengths and weaknesses and to be genuinely productive, you must have a blend of project management skills that are adaptable and ready for any situation.
  • This article touches on 8 that really make or break your projects
  • Planning, Adaptability and Problem Solving
  • Communication, Openness to Learning and Risk Awareness
  • and lastly, Commercial Awareness and Facilitation
  • The article below shares deeper insight into each of these skills.

No project is ever the same, especially when working with different stakeholders, team members, third parties, and new challenges in each moment.

Project managers and workers of all kinds have to learn fast and be adaptable, so it’s crucial you not only have these project management skills, but also that you’re always working on how you can improve them.

Having these essential skills as a project manager allows you to work productively and professionally. They will not only help you personally, but also in improving a team and, ultimately, the project itself.

projetmanagement

Via https://www.lifehack.org/872355/project-management-skills

1. Planning

If you’re not a good planner, then you’re not going to be very productive.

Planning is everything in project management as it encompasses all responsibilities of the project manager, from the project plan, risk management, budget, your time and that of those around you.

You need to be able to perform the right level of planning at the right time and with the right people. A project manager who is always calling the team together to create a new plan is going to quickly lose the faith of the team that wants to get the work done.

A project manager needs to be able to judge when to plan in detail and how far out, versus short-term planning that allows you to adjust the plan incrementally.

Being able to achieve balance between the details of long-term planning and short-term incremental planning is a skill in itself. Once you’re able to get the team into a natural flow of incremental planning, which covers the work required for risk management and dependency management, you’ll be in the right place as a project manager.

When the team enters this flow, they will be at their most productive.

Being a great planner also requires skills in task management because if you’re not productive, the work will stack up.

A project manager who can manage their tasks well has the ability to know what to work on and when. Focusing on what is important rather than what seems urgent brings the highest value to the project.

2. Adaptability

As a project manager, one of the critical skills is the ability to be adaptable to the current situation or environment. During a busy project, no one day is ever the same, so you have to be ready for whatever comes at you.

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That could be a change in the direction of the project, teammates calling in sick, left-field questions about the project from a stakeholder, or being asked to come and present an update at the last minute.

You need to expect something to happen that you didn’t plan for so that when it does happen, you can understand it with a calm mind and then take the appropriate action.

In project management, you’re typically not judged on what has just happened, but what you did next to bring a resolution to that situation.

Also be prepared to adapt how you present and communicate daily. For example, how you talk to a teammate is likely to be very different to how you speak to a CEO, Financial Controller, or the project’s stakeholder.

3. Problem Solving

When you’re a project manager, everyone expects you to have all the answers. It can be quite daunting as you can never know everything or as much as a teammate about their particular task or expertise.

What you’re expected to be able to do is to solve problems for any aspect of the project. This could be a problem like the budget being burnt too fast, team conflicts, demanding clients, or project delays.

To be a great problem solver, you need enough subject matter expertise across the whole project to be able to dig and probe to find out where the problem truly is. You can then use different problem solving techniques to solve these issues, too.

As a project manager, you must always be one step ahead of the problem as you need to be thinking about how it will impact the overall project. This systems thinking approach to problem-solving is a critical skill to develop because you don’t want to fix one problem if it just causes another elsewhere.

4. Communication

You have to be a clear and direct communicator as a project manager, whether that’s verbal or written as you’re working with diverse team roles and stakeholders, all varying in seniority.

The key to being an excellent communicator is to simplify what you’re sharing so the team member, client, or manager can take that information on board and act on it.

The project manager is there to keep the right information flowing to the right people and at the right time.

The right information can also mean the amount of information for the recipient, as a report for a CEO may need to be high-level and brief whether that’s written or verbal as they’re typically time-poor.

An update for your manager, though, may need detail as they’ll need more context so they can help and advise.

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Consistency is also essential when it comes to the communication on your project, as other team members, managers, or clients will then create their communication plans and updates around the information you provide.

The,n having designated days when you communicate certain aspects of your project must be consistent to allow this to happen.

You also need the ability to provide well-written communication, which could be in the form of email, reports, or presentations.

If your writing skills are lacking, then it’s the same issue as not being able to communicate well verbally: the recipients will either not fully understand what you’re sharing, or they will not trust it.

5. Openness to Learning

The best way to learn as a project manager is by doing, or learning on the job as it’s sometimes described. Unfortunately for many of us, learning on the job is tough as we usually learn the most through our mistakes.

Mistakes as a project manager are going to happen, and it’s how you deal with them and learn from them that make you a great project manager.

Retrospection is a big part of self-development and evaluation for you and your project team.

You need to be able to regularly take a step back and look at what worked well, what didn’t, and what you learned from it.

You can do this through individual journaling and team retrospectives. Journaling is a natural way to capture your thoughts, lessons learned, and actions at any time.

Having a journal with you at all times is key, and it can take the form of a note pad or a digital tool. Capture your learning as close to when the situations happen as possible as it’s fresh in the mind. This will allow you to use it again in the future.

Facilitating retrospectives is the first step for learning as a team, but then the project manager must support and act on these improvements post-retrospective. This helps build team morale, as well as confidence in you as a project manager as you’re helping the team develop.

6. Risk Awareness

Being risk aware means that you need to be thinking about what could go wrong on a project, not in a worried and stressful state but a focused and controlled state.

You need to be regularly thinking about how a particular task or workstream will look like in a few weeks and how you can make sure the team is as productive as possible. You should also be aware of what could stop them from working with a task, client, tool, or other team member.

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Risk management, like general project planning, requires you to be able to get the right balance between short and long term risks.

A risk that might hit the project in 6 months doesn’t need the whole team to down tools and work on how to mitigate it today. However, it is important to plan for a risk that is likely to impact the team in a week or two.

Risk management isn’t just for the project manager; it’s a team thing. A project manager isn’t going to be able to think of every risk or how to mitigate it. The team needs to support this in order to increase productivity across the board.

The project manager can probe and facilitate planning conversations or in status meetings with questions like:

  • Is that an assumption?
  • Is there anything that could stop you from completing that task?
  • Is there something I can do to make sure you have everything you need to complete the task?

These types of questions, when asked regularly, not only help manage risks, but, over time, the team starts to provide the answers without being asked.

7. Commercial Awareness

You need to understand the commercial aspects of your project, as well as how the budget works within the broader context of your business.

Having a detailed understanding of the commerciality allows you to speed up or avoid creating complicated conversations when it comes to a potential change in the budget.

Knowing what can and can’t do with the budget saves you, your team, and your financial controller time in the long run.

Consider the following example.

The team requests a new testing kit as it’s more advanced than the one you currently have in place. You understand the benefits of it, but you know exactly how much money the project can spend on external equipment, plus the reasons why this budget has been set.

Rather than extending the conversation or speaking to your financial controller, you’re able to explain to your team the reasons why they can’t purchase it and give them other options.

It’s easy to get stuck in the day to day of a project and not pay enough attention to the management of the budget. The budget is a critical component of a project due to the fact that if you don’t make a profit or maintain profitability, then it may not be deemed a success.

A project manager has to be able to balance driving the plan but at the same time managing the budget. Having an understanding of the budget allows you to then make decisions faster and with confidence when speaking with your manager and stakeholders.

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8. Facilitation

Being good at facilitating can be the difference between having a productive and enjoyable meeting and leaving the meeting with everyone frustrated with a lack of progress.

Facilitation skills allow you to get the best ideas out of a team as an engaged team member will more than likely speak up.

Excellent facilitation also helps with teasing out why problems occur through collaborative discussions.

Having excellent facilitation skills is one thing you need when running a project, but understanding your team is another. You need to be able to manage the relationships within the project team and, in some cases, deal with conflicts.

A project manager has to be good with people to be able to understand and spot their concerns, strengths, and weaknesses.

With all of this, you need to be able to facilitate not only the team dynamics but also the various types of team meetings, like planning workshops and project reviews.

Facilitation isn’t just about how you manage a workshop and deal with conflicts; as a project manager, you also need to show empathy and have a calmness about you, especially in stressful situations.

Every team member has a different story, so showing an understanding of their situation allows the you to manage the project, not by just numbers and tasks, but also by personality type.

The Bottom Line

Continuously refining, adapting, and improving these project management skills is the key to be becoming not only a great project manager but also a productive one.

If you lack in any of these skills, the impact can be that multiple issues start to occur on your project, and although small issues seem manageable in the moment, over time they begin to compound into something far harder to resolve.

Regularly review your project management skills through not only self-reflection but gathering feedback from peers and clients.

Productivity is all about how you maximize the skills you have and applying successful approaches you take. The more you repeat success, the quicker you’ll improve, and the speed to deliver them will also increase. Get started today!

More Tips on Project Management

Featured photo credit: NESA by Makers via unsplash.com

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54% of adults want to work remotely most of the time after the pandemic https://www.paulhelmick.com/54-of-adults-want-to-work-remotely-most-of-the-time-after-the-pandemic/ Sat, 09 May 2020 16:48:26 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40709 54% of adults want to work remotely most of the time after the pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has created global shifts in the way people work, shop, and socialize

  • Millions of workers have transitioned their job operations to work remotely in the wake of the coronavirus, and as these workers settle into their home-based routines, many are finding they want to continue working from home after the pandemic, as it lends itself to flexibility and productivity
  • Working from home is not only popular but other studies have shown that those who work from home full-time reported being happy in their job 22% more than their counterparts who spent no time working from home
  • As employees return to the workplace, this a shift that many employers will need to consider accomodating more.

-> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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The coronavirus pandemic has created global shifts in the way people work, shop, and socialize
  • Millions of workers have transitioned their job operations to work remotely in the wake of the coronavirus, and as these workers settle into their home-based routines, many are finding they want to continue working from home after the pandemic, as it lends itself to flexibility and productivity
  • Working from home is not only popular but other studies have shown that those who work from home full-time reported being happy in their job 22% more than their counterparts who spent no time working from home
  • As employees return to the workplace, this a shift that many employers will need to consider accomodating more.

  • The coronavirus pandemic has forced millions of workers out of office spaces and into their homes, but 54% of workers polled in a new survey say they would prefer to continue working remotely full time.
  • IBM conducted a survey among 25,000 people to gauge how perspectives about work, transportation, and leisure changed since the outbreak of the coronavirus.
  • Working from home could make workers happier and save employees and employers money.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic has created global shifts in the way people work, shop, and socialize. While not every change created during the quarantined lifestyle of the pandemic will stick, many employees hope that working from home will.

A survey conducted by IBM found that 54% of employees would prefer to primarily work remotely.

IBM polled more than 25,000 US adults during April to figure out how COVID-19 has altered their perspectives on a range of topics including working from home.

Of those surveyed, 75% said they would like to continue to work from home in at least a partial capacity, while 40% of respondents said they feel strongly that their employer should give employees the choice to opt-in to remote work..

Working remotely is also an attractive option because it can help employees save on housing. When workers don’t have to report to an office, they have more flexibility to work from home in more rural or suburban settings.

But the shift to remote work might not only benefit employees but employers as well. Instead of leasing huge offices at high-dollar prices, employers could save money by renting smaller spaces — especially since experts predict offices will transition from a place where workers go to every day, to more of a central meeting spot for important meetings and collaborative work.

Some companies have already decided to make permanent shifts to working remotely or partially remote, such as Nationwide Insurance.

The change in working preferences goes hand in hand with IBM’s other finding, which found that people are more likely to use their own vehicles for transportation and intend to rely on less public transportation, rideshares, and taxi services.

Nearly 20% of respondents who regularly used public transportation such as trains, buses, or subways said they no longer would, and another 28% said they will likely use public transportation less often.

Rideshare and taxi services saw a similar drop, while 17% of people responded that they plan to use their own vehicle more and 1 in 4 people said they would use their personal vehicle as their exclusive mode of transportation moving forward as a result of COVID-19.

Via: https://www.businessinsider.com/54-percent-adults-want-mainly-work-remote-after-pandemic-study-2020-5
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US Adults Spend More Time Accessing the Internet and Apps on Their Smartphones Than Watching Traditional TV https://www.paulhelmick.com/us-adults-spend-more-time-accessing-the-internet-and-apps-on-their-smartphones-than-watching-traditional-tv/ Sat, 09 May 2020 16:40:46 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40717 US Adults Spend More Time Accessing the Internet and Apps on Their Smartphones Than Watching Traditional TV
  • Smartphone Internet Use Outpaces Traditional TV
  • American adults spent an average of 3:58 per day accessing the internet or apps on their smartphones, and 3:27 with TV
  • Recognize that it is a mobile / app-based world and connect with your customers accordingly.

-> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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  • Smartphone Internet Use Outpaces Traditional TV
  • American adults spent an average of 3:58 per day accessing the internet or apps on their smartphones, and 3:27 with TV
  • Recognize that it is a mobile / app-based world and connect with your customers accordingly.
  • Nielsen Adult Daily Media Usage in Q32019 Apr2020

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    MIT students painstakingly recreated their iconic campus in ‘Minecraft’ https://www.paulhelmick.com/mit-students-painstakingly-recreated-their-iconic-campus-in-minecraft/ Sat, 09 May 2020 16:27:22 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40643 MIT students painstakingly recreated their iconic campus in ‘Minecraft’

    This is one of the most amazing examples of virtual design and engineering I’ve seen

    • The block-building game “Minecraft,” which Microsoft bought in 2014 for over $2 billion, has been one of the most popular games worldwide over the last 10 years and now has 145 million active players each month
    • First Check out this 2 minute fly through video of their campus in Minecraft
    • It represents over 600 students / engineers with over two months of time on task design and construction in this model
    • Second – look over the full post linked in below for some of the highlights of work done in this virtual world
    • This is truly an amazing example of the virtual worlds / environments / projects that are to come.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    This is one of the most amazing examples of virtual design and engineering I’ve seen
    • The block-building game “Minecraft,” which Microsoft bought in 2014 for over $2 billion, has been one of the most popular games worldwide over the last 10 years and now has 145 million active players each month
    • First Check out this 2 minute fly through video of their campus in Minecraft
    • It represents over 600 students / engineers with over two months of time on task design and construction in this model
    • Second – look over the full post linked in below for some of the highlights of work done in this virtual world
    • This is truly an amazing example of the virtual worlds / environments / projects that are to come.

    Full Article

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    Otter launches live transcription for Zoom meetings https://www.paulhelmick.com/otter-launches-live-transcription-for-zoom-meetings/ Sat, 02 May 2020 15:41:48 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40624 Otter launches live transcription for Zoom meetings

    Transcribing audio is a massive pain. Thankfully, Otter just made it a lot easier for people stuck at home on endless Zoom meetings.

    • The otter.ai app, available for free or with a paid plan, is by far the single best, easiest tool ever to instantly transcribe to text a meeting with one or more people.  I use it all the time to take notes from meetings, calls, etc – but I always have to upload a recording to it after the fact or have my phone out and the app up during a call.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    • The otter.ai app, available for free or with a paid plan, is by far the single best, easiest tool ever to instantly transcribe to text a meeting with one or more people.  I use it all the time to take notes from meetings, calls, etc – but I always have to upload a recording to it after the fact or have my phone out and the app up during a call.
    • If you’ve never used, otter.ai, take 10 minutes, download the app for free on your phone and just test it out – being able to search back through via text for a word or phrase that was said in an hour long meeting is incredible…
    • And with their latest announcement, you can just plug this right into your Zoom meetings and get full transcriptions of your meeting with all of the text for each participant fully broken out – it’s incredible how far this technology has come.

    otterzoom

    Here’s the full announcement:

    Vai https://mashable.com/article/otter-zoom-transcription/

    The folks at the popular audio transcription service announced Thursday that its “Live Video Meeting Notes” feature is available for those who subscribe to Otter for Teams and Zoom Pro. According to Otter’s press release, paying users can open the LIVE menu at the top of the Zoom call to see Otter’s real-time transcription and add comments or photos.Otter will also supposedly take care of downloading recorded Zoom calls for transcription after the fact, too. It can also hear both sides of a conversation when a speaker is wearing headphones.

    Otter for Teams the most expensive service tier for Otter, coming in at $30 per month. That means this feature is more of a business-first inclusion, as useful as it may be for the site’s free users or those who pay for the individual product. You can get two months of free Otter for Teams service with the offer code “OTTER_RELIEF,” but the feature could very well be useful beyond two months from now.

    Teams users are having a good week, but things aren’t quite as peachy for free users. As Mashable’s resident Otter expert Matt Binder found out, free users are now limited to just three file uploads before they have to upgrade their plan. They can still do up to 600 minutes of live transcription per month, but transcription after the fact is now almost impossible without coughing up at least $10 per month.

    Still, businesses that rely on Zoom and can afford Otter for Teams might want to give this new transcription tool a shot. We also recommend the live transcription feature on the Google Pixel 4 if you’ve got one of those lying around.

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    Now Is an Unprecedented Opportunity to Hire Great Talent https://www.paulhelmick.com/now-is-an-unprecedented-opportunity-to-hire-great-talent/ Sat, 02 May 2020 15:34:17 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40654 Now Is an Unprecedented Opportunity to Hire Great Talent

    While the Covid-19 pandemic hits and reshapes companies, industries, national economies, and our society in previously unthinkable ways, business leaders need to think beyond survival to the opportunities this crisis might create, not only for their own organizations but the greater good. Chief among these is a chance to hire talented people at a time when they might have trouble finding or keeping jobs elsewhere.

    • According to The Economist, four-fifths of CEOs worry about skill shortages, while outside hiring at the top reached record highs, causing business for large global search firms to increase by 9% to 15% last year.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    While the Covid-19 pandemic hits and reshapes companies, industries, national economies, and our society in previously unthinkable ways, business leaders need to think beyond survival to the opportunities this crisis might create, not only for their own organizations but the greater good. Chief among these is a chance to hire talented people at a time when they might have trouble finding or keeping jobs elsewhere.
    • According to The Economist, four-fifths of CEOs worry about skill shortages, while outside hiring at the top reached record highs, causing business for large global search firms to increase by 9% to 15% last year.
    • Now, many companies are laying off workers and downsizing. Some sectors are collapsing. It seems an unprecedented number of people, around the world, from new graduates to seasoned veterans, will be looking for employment.
    • Throughout history, economic hardships have created windows in which exceptional employees and leaders are widely available for a limited time.
    • Explore the thinking and questions below about how to attract world-class talent to your organization.

     

    Via https://hbr.org/2020/05/now-is-an-unprecedented-opportunity-to-hire-great-talent

    We’ve made our coronavirus coverage free for all readers. To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Daily Alert newsletter.

    Further Reading

    Now, many companies are laying off workers and downsizing. Some sectors are collapsing. It seems an unprecedented number of people, around the world, from new graduates to seasoned veterans, will be looking for employment. At the same time, a major force that had been fueling the intensity of the war for talent — globalization — might recede. As companies revisit their international expansion strategies and cross-border business practices, workers are recalculating their personal purpose and individual and family priorities, with serious implications for their geographic and work preferences and travel habits.

    The pool of available talent is suddenly both changing and expanding, and visionary leaders can make the most of it, preparing the ground for post-crisis recovery and growth. As management guru Jim Collins has shown us, making the leap from good to great starts with getting the right people on the bus.

    History Lessons

    Throughout history, economic hardships have created windows in which exceptional employees and leaders are widely available for a limited time. In the late 1940s, for example, many organizations were struggling. At Hewlett-Packard, the fledgling electronic equipment maker that would eventually become one of America’s best-known technology companies, business was slow and finances strained. But as legions of great engineers streamed out of closing or soon-to-close U.S. military labs, HP’s legendary founders Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard realized they couldn’t let such an amazing hiring opportunity pass them by. When asked how they could afford to keep taking on new people in those difficult years, their answer was simple: “How could we afford not to!”  Years later, when asked about the biggest contributor to HP’s success over the years, they routinely cited their willingness to invest in talent no matter the external economic climate.

    While most of us become short-sighted and irrational during crises, the best leaders and organizations stay calm and use them to their advantage, sprinting away from their competitors and never looking back. To use another analogy, they bring in architects to plan the new building even as the firefighters work to save the old one.

    Harvard Business School’s Ranjay Gulati, Nitin Nohria, and Franz Wohlgezogen considered the benefits of this kind of long-term thinking in an analysis of 4,700 companies across the last three recessions. They discovered that 9% were able to come out in much better positions than they entered because of their “progressive” focus. They did cut back, but were extremely selective about when and where they did so and, more importantly, they continued to make strategic investments. Rather than thinking in “either/or” terms — you’re either hiring or you’re downsizing — they, like HP following the war, embraced the “and,” understanding they could do both things if they were smart about it.

    Unfortunately, most companies make the mistake of uniformly freezing hiring in downturns. During the 2008 global financial crisis, BCG and the European Association for People Management surveyed 3,400 executives, including 90 senior human resources leaders in more than 30 countries, to see how they were responding. The most frequent action (or reaction) was to scale back recruiting. At the same time, survey participants rated the selective hiring of high-performing employees from competitors as one of the three most effective responses to the previous crisis (from a list of 22) and the one with the best impact on employee commitment. This irrationality is widespread. Those who stay rational can capitalize on it.

    Seizing the Opportunity

    So, how should visionary leaders go about capturing this once-in-a-century hiring opportunity? Through urgent and disciplined engagement in several initiatives:

    Ask your top leaders to list three to five great players they would have liked to have hired over the past five years and then check in with those people.

    These will probably be individuals they frequently deal with (as suppliers, advisors, clients), or even assessed as past potential candidates. In your next executive team meeting, discuss everyone’s selections, rank them in terms of attractiveness for and to your company, and agree on who to contact. It’s possible that many will now be open to considering an offer because their circumstances have changed. One of the best staff hires I ever made for Egon Zehnder was a brilliant young executive I’d previously met in Latin America whose career I had tracked closely for more than 10 years. He’d told me he would never consider joining the executive search profession. Yet, two decades ago, at a crucial time in his career as a CEO of a sizable company, the time was right. I asked, and he came on board. He has since become a global partner and office leader in his home country, as well as playing all sorts of key global roles.

    Set up a task force to source potential candidates from target sectors and companies who may now be either jobless or open to change.

    Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, has repeatedly stated that the company’s high hiring bar is a critical factor in its success. When many years ago I spoke at one of its global recruiting summits, I met an army of hundreds of Amazonians dedicated to exactly that: bringing in the most promising new hires from target sectors and companies. One of them specialized full time in the military sector, in his view one of the best sources of talent in the United States. All companies should bring this level of focus and discipline to sourcing potential candidates, especially during this period. Insist that your senior HR leaders step up their efforts and purposefully assign some of your top-line managers to scout for outstanding people in key functions, particularly ones coming from hard-hit sectors such as airlines, hotels, and recreation, or start-ups that might already be faltering in the face of recession.

    Interview and check references remotely with the same rigor you would in person.

    Thanks to modern technology, we have the ability to replicate all of our traditional hiring processes and procedures in remote, physically distanced settings. Telephone calls and video conferences are a must. And then follow the same guidelines for great recruitment experts have described for years. Outline the qualities and competencies you’re looking for in a new hire before you start; at this time of flux, I would give heavy weight to soft skills, including inspirational leadership, change management, collaboration, and influencing, as well as the potential to keep growing, learning, and adapting to new circumstances. Such potential will stem from their curiosity, insight, engagement, and determination, on top of the right motivation. Ask behavior-based questions, such as “Could you tell me about a time you led your team through a big transition?” Record your thoughts and observations about how the person measures up to your initial metrics as soon as you’re done. Bring in more than one but not too many interviewers and compare notes with them. And carefully check references. Decades of social research have concluded that third-party opinions are much more accurate than individuals’ own views of themselves, particularly for soft skills.

    Go out of your way to motivate the best candidates. 

    Once you are convinced that you have the opportunity to bring in someone you really want, arrange to have the person speak to senior leaders who can share their love and passion for your company and describe the value they hope to build with the new colleague. Pay can be important but research shows that what truly motivates knowledge workers is a high level of autonomy, mastery, and purpose. In these trying times, flexible work arrangements will no doubt continue to be key, as will the chance to keep on learning and growing while working to build something larger than ourselves.

    Don’t ignore the sourcing, retaining, and development of in-house talent.

    This is also the time to carefully review your existing key players, stay closer to them than ever, assess their skills and knowledge in light of the revised outlook for you sector and company, and help them move from potential to success with targeted development plans including the right type of stretch assignments, which often arise from crises. During the 2001 economic collapse in Argentina, in which annualized GDP fell by 30% coupled with a 300% currency devaluation, I was contacted by an American bank operating in the country. It had lost more money there in a few weeks than it had made in cumulative profits over the previous century. And yet, at that point its leaders asked me to set up a retention plan for its top executives in Argentina. Their reasoning? Because of the bank’s situation, competitors would be targeting their talent; however, those were the very people they still needed to recover some those monumental losses.

    This pandemic has created unprecedented trauma around the world. The economic fallout will be equally painful for many. It can be tempting to focus on the short term of crisis management. But when we emerge from this unfolding tragedy, it will be the long-term thinkers who not only survive but thrive. If your organization is well-capitalized and visionary enough to hire for lasting greatness, now is the time.

    If our free content helps you to contend with these challenges, please consider subscribing to HBR. A subscription purchase is the best way to support the creation of these resources.

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    The U.S. Is Not Headed Toward a New Great Depression https://www.paulhelmick.com/the-u-s-is-not-headed-toward-a-new-great-depression/ Sat, 02 May 2020 15:19:54 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40648 The U.S. Is Not Headed Toward a New Great Depression

    There is no doubt that the coronavirus is driving a macroeconomic meltdown around the world. In the U.S. and elsewhere, heavy job losses will likely drive unemployment figures to levels not seen since the Great Depression.

    • Fiscal efforts to contain the crisis are pushing deficits to levels last seen during World War II.
    • Both developments have spurred fears and commentary that the crisis is spiraling into either a depression or a debt crisis.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    There is no doubt that the coronavirus is driving a macroeconomic meltdown around the world. In the U.S. and elsewhere, heavy job losses will likely drive unemployment figures to levels not seen since the Great Depression.
    • Fiscal efforts to contain the crisis are pushing deficits to levels last seen during World War II.
    • Both developments have spurred fears and commentary that the crisis is spiraling into either a depression or a debt crisis.
    • This HBR article shares 4 very supported reasons why it will not be as bad as everyone thinks.

     

    Via https://hbr.org/2020/05/the-u-s-is-not-headed-toward-a-new-great-depression

    But is it too soon for such pessimism? The intensity of this shock isn’t in question — the depth and speed of the fall in output is unparalleled and frightening. And coronavirus will also leave a structural macroeconomic legacy if economies don’t return fully to their old growth trajectory or rates. But it’s a long way from a macroeconomic shock — even a severe one — to a structural regime break, such as a depression or a debt crisis.

    Price stability is the parameter to watch — it’s the key to a favorable macroeconomic regime. A break such as a depression or a debt crisis is marked by a shift to extreme deflation or inflation, respectively, and thus a breakdown of the normal functioning of the economy. Over the last 30 years, the U.S. economy has enjoyed falling, low, and stable inflation, which in turn, has driven low interest rates, longer business cycles, and high asset valuations. But if price stability falters, there would be massive consequences for the real and financial economies.

    So, knowing that, how worried should we be?

    The Four Paths to a Structural Regime Break

    Policy and politics are what stand between a severe crisis and a structural regime break. Persistently inadequate policy responses — rooted either in an inability or a political unwillingness — are what fail to stop the negative trajectory of a crisis-ridden economy. We’ve mapped four paths that lead to a structural regime break, using historical examples to illustrate each.

    1. Policy Error

    The first path to a depression occurs when politicians and policymakers conceptually struggle to diagnose and remedy the problem. The Great Depression is a classic example — it was an epic policy failure, which facilitated not only the depth of the crisis but also its length and legacy. Two conceptual misunderstandings were involved:

    • Monetary policy error and banking crisis: Limited oversight of the banking system, tight monetary policy, and bank runs resulted in thousands of bank failures and enormous losses to depositors between 1929 and 1933. The collapsing banking system crippled the flow of credit to firms and households. Even though the Federal Reserve was created in 1913, ostensibly to fight such crises, it stood by as the banking system collapsed, believing that monetary policy was on easy footing. In reality, it was stuck in a conceptual error.
    • Fiscal policy error and austerity: Politicians also stood by and watched the economy bleed out for much too long. The New Deal came too late to prevent the depression, and it was too little to reverse its impact. And when fiscal policy tightened again in 1937-38, the economy collapsed again. Eventually, World War II decisively ended the Great Depression by massively boosting aggregate demand, and even returning economic output to its pre-depression trend.

    The result of these policy mistakes was severe deflation (collapse in the price level) by well over 20%. This meant that while unemployment was at very high levels, the nominal value of many assets fell sharply, while the real burden of most debts rose sharply — leaving household and firms struggling to regain their footing.

    2. Political Willingness

    The second path from a deep crisis to a depression happens when the economic diagnosis is clear, and the remedies are known, but politicians stand in the path of solution. It’s a problem of willingness, more than understanding and mindsets.

    To illustrate this risk, we don’t have to look far: A lack of political will drove the U.S. economy dangerously close to a deflationary depression in 2008, when the U.S. Congress could not agree on a path forward in the global financial crisis.

    By late 2008, bank capital losses were piling up, leading to a credit crunch that was crippling the economy. With a rickety banking system, the risk of a path to a deflationary depression was real — as underlined by collapsing inflation expectations in the depth of the crisis.

    The most dangerous moment came on Sept. 29, 2008, when the House of Representatives voted down TARP, the $700 billion rescue package to recapitalize (or bail out) banks. The ensuing market collapse helped change the political price of standing in TARP’s way, and a few days later, on Oct. 3, the bill was passed.

    Effectively, political willingness came together in the last minute to prevent a structural regime break and contained the structural legacy to a U-shaped shock. While the U.S. economy regained its growth rate after a few years, it never found its way back to pre-crisis growth path, which is the definition of a U-shaped shock.

    3. Policy Dependence

    A third potential path from severe crisis to a depression is when policy makers do not have the operational autonomy, authority, or fiscal resources to act. This happens in countries or territories that lack monetary sovereignty, or central bank autonomy — in other words, in times of crisis they can’t use the central bank to ensure a healthy flow of credit even if their currency is stable. Internal depression — price and wage deflation — is the only way for such economies to rebalance and satisfy the constraints of monetary dependence.

    Perhaps the best example of such dependence is Greece’s relationship with the European Central Bank in the context of the global financial crisis. Unable to use the ECB for access to financing, Greece had to enter a depression that came with severe deflationary pressures.

    4. Policy Rejection

    The fourth path differs from the previous three in that it leads to a debt crisis, rather than a depression. In this case, policy makers know what to do, have the political will, yet they can’t raise the real resources to do anything, as the markets reject their actions. This is distinct from the other three paths in that instead of deflation, it leads to high inflation.

    Further Reading

    Think Argentina at various points in time, the Asian financial crisis of 1997, the Latin American debt crisis of the 1980s, and, further back, Weimar Germany: In all of these instances, policy makers were unable to raise the real resources to finance their spending because debt and currency markets reject it.

    When looking at debt crisis risks, commentators too often are preoccupied with debt levels, but this is a misunderstanding of debt crises. They happen — and do not happen — at all levels of debt-to-GDP. Other factors, including anchored inflation expectations, negative risk-rate correlations (when risk goes up, rates go down), global demand for the currency in question, as well as the difference between nominal interest and growth rates all influence an economy’s ability to finance itself more than the debt-to-GDP ratio.

    Why the U.S. Is Unlikely to be Headed Towards a Structural Regime Break

    Though the path from the crisis we’re in now to either depression or debt crisis is not impossible, it’s not easy or natural, if we examine each of the four paths in regards to the current situation:

    • Policy Error — The policy challenge of coronavirus is enormous, but what is on display is the opposite of the inaction of the Great Depression. On the monetary side, the first signs of stress in the banking system — in the repo and commercial paper markets — were met with timely and sizable monetary policy action. On the fiscal side, it didn’t take long — certainly by Washington standards — to pass the $2 trillion CARES Act to provide funds to counteract the wave of liquidity and capital problems for the real economy (households and firms). Beyond any specific policy action, we are seeing a mindset in which policy makers will keep throwing policy innovations at the problem until something sticks — quite the opposite of the 1930s.
    • Political Willingness — It certainly is possible that political calculus gets in the way of averting a structural breakdown, but not very plausible because the political costs are high. To be sure there are two risks involved: 1) The unwillingness to craft a piece of legislation, perhaps because of differences in analysis, beliefs, or dogma; and 2) the failure to pass legislation because one side sees greater political gain in obstruction. While the TARP fiasco reminds us that both risks are real and shouldn’t be dismissed, crises tend to lubricate deal making, and the costs of political obstruction are particularly high, even in a hyper-partisan election year.
    • Policy Dependence — This path is not applicable in the U.S. because of monetary sovereignty. The Federal Reserve will always facilitate fiscal policy in a time of low and stable inflation and a healthy currency.
    • Policy Rejection — A debt crisis seems improbable for the U.S.: Inflation expectations are very well anchored (and, if anything, too low). The rate-risk correlation is very solid, where in risk-off periods (moment when investors are less tolerant of risk and prices of risk assets like stocks fall) bond prices rally (yields fall). The USD reserve currency status is deeply entrenched as the rest of the world needs to hold U.S. safe assets (and don’t wish to see their currencies appreciate). And nominal interest rates are generally lower than nominal growth (r – g < 0). All of these factors make for favorable financing conditions. Can coronavirus damage all that and deliver a crisis where markets refuse to purchase U.S. debt? It’s possible, but very implausible, and it would be a long and painful process. A break in the inflation regime plays out over several years.

    Why, then, are we seeing fears of a break take hold?

    We think at least part of the answer is the extreme intensity of the coronavirus shock. The depth and speed of output contraction threatens to influence perceptions and risk assessment in other dimensions of this shock, such as the structural legacy (the shape of the recovery) and the risks of structural regime break.

    While these fears are understandable, the analytical errors resulting from them could have significant consequences in terms of setting false expectations and encouraging inappropriate plans. A few principles of intellectual discipline may help leaders avoid these analytical traps:

    • Beware implicit and explicit equivalences to historical events. If describing the future, be aware of historical benchmarks. Meanwhile, if using historical benchmarks, be aware of their drivers and relevance to the present day.
    • Be wary of single data points and the inferences that can be drawn from them. Is there a passing resemblance or causal equivalence? Record outcomes in any data set always make great headlines, particularly in financial and economic reports, but the overall context determines their true significance.
    • Step back when fear is dominating the thought process and when extrapolating from high-intensity events. Even the worst ever in one dimension doesn’t mean the worst along all dimensions.
    • Be cognizant of what your scenarios imply: A depression-driven regime break also means large-scale deflation. A debt crisis regime break also means a weak currency and high inflation. Are these corollary conditions consistent and do they fit the facts?

    If our free content helps you to contend with these challenges, please consider subscribing to HBR. A subscription purchase is the best way to support the creation of these resources.

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    Coursera to give unemployed workers free access to 3,800 online courses https://www.paulhelmick.com/coursera-to-give-unemployed-workers-free-access-to-3800-online-courses/ Sat, 02 May 2020 15:13:42 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40634 Coursera to give unemployed workers free access to 3,800 online courses

    Online learning platform Coursera will make 3,800 of its courses available for free to people unemployed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    • The goal of the initiative is to help workers develop skills to become re-employed, according to a Coursera blog post.
    • You can’t apply as an individual for the free courses; government agencies that serve unemployed workers have to apply for access.  This should be helpful in allowing workers to upskill or reskill w/minimal cost other than their time to learn.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

    ]]>
    Online learning platform Coursera will make 3,800 of its courses available for free to people unemployed due to the coronavirus pandemic.
    • The goal of the initiative is to help workers develop skills to become re-employed, according to a Coursera blog post.
    • You can’t apply as an individual for the free courses; government agencies that serve unemployed workers have to apply for access.  This should be helpful in allowing workers to upskill or reskill w/minimal cost other than their time to learn.
    • About 30 million people in the US have filed for unemployment in the past five weeks amid stay-at-home orders.
    • We’ve used Coursera training for several years for our teams to stay sharp with technical coding, business and marketing automation skills – it’s an amazing resource.
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    It’s Time to Rethink the Way You Attract Customers. Here’s How https://www.paulhelmick.com/its-time-to-rethink-the-way-you-attract-customers-heres-how/ Sat, 02 May 2020 15:00:20 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40657 It’s Time to Rethink the Way You Attract Customers. Here’s How

    It’s essential to have something of value, whether you call it a lead magnet, opt in, freebie, just some form of giveaway that lets potential customers get a little something of value free from their company in exchange for an email address.

    • Being generous in business can lead to greater loyalty and profits. These days, companies are doing this in the form of donations to the front lines, or shifting product lines to manufacture medical gowns instead of formal ones, for example.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

    ]]>
    It’s essential to have something of value, whether you call it a lead magnet, opt in, freebie, just some form of giveaway that lets potential customers get a little something of value free from their company in exchange for an email address.
    • Being generous in business can lead to greater loyalty and profits. These days, companies are doing this in the form of donations to the front lines, or shifting product lines to manufacture medical gowns instead of formal ones, for example. To be sure, these are big business changes — but here’s the connection to lead magnets.
    • When we see a lot of something, our brains judge it to be more important — in behavioral economics this is known as availability bias. When customers see sweeping generosity from many companies who may not have had that philosophy in the past, they raise their expectations for all businesses’ offerings.
    • To put it bluntly, even if they don’t realize it, people are expecting you and your business to give more than you ever have before. This higher expectation means your lead magnet needs to be generous and targeted to the current situation.
    • Here’s how to evaluate your current offer to ensure it’s still relevant and attractive.

    Via: https://www.inc.com/melina-palmer/its-time-to-rethink-way-you-attract-customers-heres-how.html

    Lead magnets are a great tool because it triggers reciprocity — a human’s natural desire to want to reciprocate whenever something is given to them.

    The good news is you potentially have some staff who can work on revitalizing your old opt in to one that meets the times. Here are some things to consider when reviewing your lead magnet:

    Does it still make sense?

    If your lead magnet was a tip sheet for putting on in-person events, or a checklist to make sure you packed everything before your business trip, it is not going to be useful to anyone right now. Consider your expertise and how it can shift to fit today’s needs (just like clothing brands that are making PPE).

    What keeps people up at night?

    When deciding on a direction for your new lead magnet, it is important to get into the mindset of your target market — what are they worried about and how can you fill that gap? Perhaps a tip sheet about putting on a virtual summit or how event planners can make up lost revenues. If your opt in isn’t solving a current problem, it is creating unnecessary noise that can reflect badly on your company. At best you could look oblivious and at worst you may look cold and uncaring.

    Where is the quick win?

    Customers’ brains are overloaded with lots of extra stuff right now. That means they likely don’t have the capacity for a big, cumbersome lead magnet. This is great news for you! It may feel like you need to go bigger to give more value, but that isn’t necessarily true. Putting in the extra time and effort to create a clear, simple, easily implemented freebie that helps people gain some confidence or get a quick win will be more impactful.

    Does it still fit your overall brand?

    Sure, you could make a lead magnet that a million people would enjoy, but if they aren’t also potential customers down the road it will not have the overall value for your business. Take some time to think about how this updated lead magnet ties into your company overall. Who is it for and if they wanted to buy something from you (that turns the quick win into a bigger success) how does one lead to the other? And, when we eventually emerge on the other side of this pandemic, are all these new leads you have connected to your business going to stick around? If not, reconsider the strategy.

    Most importantly…

    There are more people online than ever before, and they are shaking up their routines looking for solutions to problems they had never even considered. That means there are opportunities for all sorts of companies to be helpful and become relevant to a whole new set of customers.

    Though it is important to remember that the new lead magnet needs to be more about them than it is about you. Give generously and knowing that many of those people may never buy from you, and that is ok. Those who do buy may be further down the line than your regular lead cycle, and that is ok too.

    Today’s generosity in the form of a well crafted lead magnet will help your business to be on people’s minds now and into the future.

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    How to use iPad app multitasking to get more done https://www.paulhelmick.com/ipad-multitasking/ https://www.paulhelmick.com/ipad-multitasking/#respond Sat, 25 Apr 2020 16:19:52 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/ipad-multitasking/ How to use iPad app multitasking to get more done

    These new gestures make using the iPad even more convenient and useful than ever.

    • This is a short 5 minute video – and if you have an iPad – it’s worth watching twice!
    • Many of these tricks were new to me – and a couple of them are super useful
    • Having your text/messages float over any app you are using – very nice
    • Being able to split the screen with two apps – like a browser and email at the same time – quite helpful
    • Just keeps you from having to flip back and forth all of the time – hope you enjoy the ‘productivity boost’!

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    These new gestures make using the iPad even more convenient and useful than ever.
    • This is a short 5 minute video – and if you have an iPad – it’s worth watching twice!
    • Many of these tricks were new to me – and a couple of them are super useful
    • Having your text/messages float over any app you are using – very nice
    • Being able to split the screen with two apps – like a browser and email at the same time – quite helpful
    • Just keeps you from having to flip back and forth all of the time – hope you enjoy the ‘productivity boost’!

     

    ]]>
    https://www.paulhelmick.com/ipad-multitasking/feed/ 0 31633
    How the Coronavirus Crisis Is Redefining Jobs https://www.paulhelmick.com/how-the-coronavirus-crisis-is-redefining-jobs/ Sat, 25 Apr 2020 16:09:49 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40605 How the Coronavirus Crisis Is Redefining Jobs

    Three insights from HBR on how works needs to change

    1. Make work portable across the organization.
    2. Accelerate automation
    3. Share employees in cross-industry talent exchanges

    We’ve been doing a lot to help clients with the first two – the last one is a new idea – but with everyone online now, it’s easier than ever to bring new talent into a team to help with projects – the idea of a talent exchange is pretty insightful.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

    ]]>

    Three insights from HBR on how works needs to change

    1. Make work portable across the organization.
    2. Accelerate automation
    3. Share employees in cross-industry talent exchanges

    We’ve been doing a lot to help clients with the first two – the last one is a new idea – but with everyone online now, it’s easier than ever to bring new talent into a team to help with projects – the idea of a talent exchange is pretty insightful.

    Executive Summary

    During this uncertain time, leaders have an unprecedented opportunity to reimagine how work gets done. The authors propose three ways to shift work, talent, and skills to where and when they are needed most: 1) Make work portable across your organization. Many organizations, such as Unilever and Cisco, have set up internal project marketplaces that break down work into tasks and projects so that it can be matched with people with the most relevant skills and availability from anywhere in the organization. 2) Accelerate automation. Automation can pick up tasks to increase reliability, improve safety and well-being, and handle sudden spikes in demand for certain types of work. 3) Share employees in cross-industry talent exchanges. This innovative response temporarily moves employees without work due to the crisis (e.g., airlines, hospitality) to those organizations that have an excess of work (e.g., health, logistics, some retail stores). This avoids the frictional and reputational costs associated with letting people go while supporting workers in developing new skills and networks.

     

    Martin Barraud/Getty Images

    We’ve made our coronavirus coverage free for all readers. To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Daily Alert newsletter.

    The outbreak of Covid-19 has forced organizations into perhaps the most significant social experiment of the future of work in action, with work from home and social distancing policies radically changing the way we work and interact. But the impact on work is far more profound than just changing where people work; it is also fundamentally altering what work is performed and how we perform it.

    Many workers are doing tasks they never could have imaged a few weeks ago — sometimes in ways they wouldn’t have thought of. Employees in apparel companies like Brooks Brothers and New Balance are now producing surgical masks and gowns, while Tesla, Ford, and General Motors have retooled their factories to produce ventilators from car parts after idling their automotive plants due to plummeting consumer demand.

    Further Reading

    With jobs at the heart of how work gets done, leaders have an unprecedented opportunity to reimagine them by rearranging work and having employees take on different responsibilities to better respond to the evolving needs of their organizations, customers, and employees. We propose three ways to shift work, talent, and skills to where and when they are needed most, thereby building the organizational resilience and agility necessary to navigate uncertain times and rebound with strength when the economy recovers.

    1. Make work portable across the organization.

    Given the current situation with Covid-19, it’s more important than ever to move people to the most mission critical work as fast and efficiently as possible. As part of its coronavirus crisis response, for example, Bank of America is temporarily converting more than 3,000 employees from across the bank into positions intended to field an onslaught of calls from consumer and small business customers.

    By breaking out of rigid job constraints, the right talent and work can be matched to solve evolving business challenges in real time. Networks of teams empowered to operate outside of existing organizational hierarchy and bureaucratic structures are a critical capability to reacting quickly in times of crisis.

    Many organizations, such as Allianz Global Investors and Cisco, have already set up internal project marketplaces that break down work into tasks and projects that can be matched with people from anywhere in the organization with relevant skills and availability. These marketplaces can enable people who suddenly find themselves bereft of their normal job tasks to quickly and easily find different work using their core or adjacent skills where their contributions make a difference.

    Using such marketplaces, organizations can also quickly backfill a sick employee, add extra team members to mission-critical projects, and cope with sudden hiring freezes. One hiring manager faced with a freeze recently split an intended new hire position into five part-time experiences for existing employees — thereby giving employees new opportunities to learn and grow while also enabling him to meet his business goals.

    Deconstructing jobs into component tasks also makes it easier to see which tasks can be performed by workers working remotely or in other geographic locations. Leaders can bundle adjacent tasks that allow for remote work into new jobs, and port the tasks that require on-site work into other, fewer jobs — thereby limiting the amount of work that must be performed in the office or on-site.

    2. Accelerate automation.

    For certain types of work, automation can increase reliability, improve safety and well being, and handle sudden spikes in demand. In fact, automation isn’t a job-killer in today’s economic environment, it is becoming a mandatory capability to deal with a crisis.

    Many utility companies have expanded their use of automation software in recent weeks to allow workers to operate, monitor, and control systems remotely, thereby reducing the risk of human exposure to the virus and enabling utilities to run smoothly without service disruptions.

    To handle increased call volume, others have increased their use of automation in call centers. Automation can speed up response times and free agents from transactional tasks so that they can focus on responding with the empathy and emotional intelligence that customers need now more than ever.

    3. Share employees in cross-industry talent exchanges.

    As leaders, we must all ask ourselves: How can we tap into the broader ecosystem of talent to build the resilience of both organizations and people during these challenging times? One innovative response is to develop a cross-industry talent exchange, temporarily moving employees without work due to the crisis (e.g., airlines, hospitality) to those organizations that have an excess of work (e.g., health, logistics, some retail stores). This avoids the frictional and reputational costs associated with letting people go while supporting workers in developing new skills and networks.

    For example, supermarket Kroger is temporarily borrowing furloughed employees for 30 days from Sysco Corporation, a wholesale food distributor to restaurants that has been hit hard by the coronavirus.

    Months earlier in China, companies also creatively started sharing employees, moving employees without work from organizations like restaurants and lending them to others that have had a spike in demand like Hema, Alibaba’s retail grocery chain known for its fast grocery food delivery. More than 3,000 new employees from more than 40 companies in different sectors have joined Hema’s employee sharing plan.

    In these arrangements, the companies receiving employees define which skills they’re looking for. They then work with the companies sharing their employees to define the length of the exchange as well as the implications for pay, benefits, and insurance.

    Although the Covid-19 pandemic is a difficult time, it can also be a time of unprecedented creativity. Reimagining jobs around the constraints of today’s challenging business environment may accelerate the future of work and open up new and innovative ways in how, where, and by whom work gets done. Ultimately, this can help us build greater resilience and efficiency in our organizations, and help people live healthier, more sustainable lives.

    If our free content helps you to contend with these challenges, please consider subscribing to HBR. A subscription purchase is the best way to support the creation of these resources.

    Via: https://hbr.org/2020/04/how-the-coronavirus-crisis-is-redefining-jobs

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    How To Teach Online During the Current Crisis https://www.paulhelmick.com/how-to-teach-online-during-the-current-crisis/ Sat, 25 Apr 2020 16:00:41 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40306 How To Teach Online During the Current Crisis
    • David Siteman Garland is an incredible internet entrepreneur know for his podcasts, interviews and online courses
    • In his post he shares some awesome tips about how to teach and best share your knowledge with your community
    • Here’s a summary with the full guide below
    • 1/ Format – Slides, On Camera or Screencasts
    • 2/ Delivery – Live or Pre-Recorded
    • 3/ Format – Virtual Coaching, Classes, Workshops or Subscriptions
    • 4/ How to market it.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

    ]]>
  • David Siteman Garland is an incredible internet entrepreneur know for his podcasts, interviews and online courses
  • In his post he shares some awesome tips about how to teach and best share your knowledge with your community
  • Here’s a summary with the full guide below
  • 1/ Format – Slides, On Camera or Screencasts
  • 2/ Delivery – Live or Pre-Recorded
  • 3/ Format – Virtual Coaching, Classes, Workshops or Subscriptions
  • 4/ How to market it.
  • I’ve listened to David’s best practices for years and it’s on-point – here’s his full writeup on his strategy.
  • Full Article

    Via: https://therisetothetop.com/general/how-to-teach-online-during-the-current-crisis/

    • So, the world is in a bit of chaos. OK, a lot of chaos. The virus. The economy. The uncertainty. The change.
    • People are being advised (or more than advised) they can’t work/play/etc. which has brought more people home than ever before.
    • Of course…health, safety, food, shelter…those are the most important.
    • The economy is shifting out of necessity. In-person classes, trainings,
    • etc. are being replaced with a new home economy. And it’s not just
    • “work from home.” This new emerging economy is “TEACH from home.
    • There is a HUGE uptick in online learning. Why? Because people are ‘stuck’
    • at home and looking to learn, pursue passions and even start businesses.
    • Just scrolling through my Facebook feed is very telling.

     

    • At The Rise To The Top, we have have been teaching people online learning for over 11 years with thousands of customers in over 100 countries.
    • We wanted to put this guide together to help guide you during uncertain times and the new economy and reality in front of us.
    • The world needs your knowledge more than ever and in this guide we are going to show you and share with you some ideas of how you can do that online.
    • Regardless if you are taking something offline and teaching it online (free or paid) or creating a new business or whatever-your-goal-is, we are here to help.
    • This guide is meant to be an overview to introduce you to this new “Teach from home” (and continuing to grow…learn from home) economy. You will find insights, tips and strategies (as well as technical recommendations).
    • We will make it through this. And make the best of our new reality.
    • -David Siteman Garland

    Founder of The Rise To The Top & Create Awesome Online Courses


    How to Teach Online During The Current Crisis

    Where to get started?

    First of all, a fun fact (especially if you are new to teaching online): Anything that can be taught offline, can be taught online. We have seen success with literally thousands of topics ranging across the board. A few of that might make your eyebrows go up a bit and say “Realllllllllly?” Include:

    The good news is that now, more than ever before, tools and mediums (i.e Instagram LIVE, Facebook LIVE, etc.) have made it SUPER EASY to share live and pre-recorded content online. This wasn’t the case even 5 years ago. The tech has evolved so it is no longer a barrier.

    Also keep in mind…

    It’s all about the content.

    Read that again.

    It’s not about fancy production (good news, you can cancel your contract with Steven Spielberg).

    It’s not about needing some kind of crazy-mega camera. The one in your pocket and/or on your computer is probably good enough.

    We are not aiming for a perfect production here.

    We are not aiming to cancel everything and cry in the corner if your kiddo wonders into the room.

    We ARE aiming to help people get results. Offline teaching and online teaching both have the same goal:

    GET RESULTS.

    First thing to decide on: The FORMAT.

    When it comes to format there are really 3 ways of delivering online content (and yes you CAN mix and match).

    Option 1: SLIDES (powerpoint, keynote or anything else…Prezi is another option for slides).

    Slides are just like they sound…slides. You are simply talking over slides. While this might sound a bit boring, it’s an effective way for people to learn information and also to go back and read parts of what they missed.

    Again, we are focusing on simplicity here. You can have picture-heavy slides. Text-heavy slides it doesn’t matter. At the end of the day, it is all about helping people get results!

    It then is as simple as plugging in a microphone (microphone recommendations are coming up!) and recording your slides.

    Option 2: ON CAMERA: If you have a topic that is more visual (fitness, cooking, martial arts, etc.) the best option for you will most likely be “on camera”

    You…talking. Demonstrating. Sharing, etc.

    One of the best pieces of advice I’ve heard when it comes to camera is to first ask…”What do I already have?”

    A phone with a nice camera?A nice webcam?

    Often times that is more than good enough. Especially where technology is now.

    Want to get fancier? No worries. Here are some great camera recommendations (and microphones!)

    Option 3: SCREENCASTS:

    If you are SHOWING someone something on your computer, Screencasts are another great option. Screencasts are essentially someone sitting on your shoulder (not literally, hah) to show you how to do something. For example, how to set up a website or how to use a particular piece of software, etc.

    Later on in this guide, we will break down easy-to-use screencasting tools.

    Second thing to decide on is DELIVERY:

    #1: Will this be live?

    #2: Will this be pre-recorded?

    A quick break down…

    LIVE:

    Live…is just that. LIVE. And if you are scared of live, don’t be. There is an organic nature of live where people don’t expect things to be perfect. Again, it’s all about the content.

    The good news is here in 2020..it has never, ever been easier to “Go Live” to deliver your content.

    And while you might not be a pro at first (OK…something nobody talks about…NOBODY is a pro at first) over time you will absolutely get the hang of it. Like everything, it gets easier with time and experience.

    When it comes to delivering online trainings, classes, workshops, etc that people PAY FOR here are some quick recommendations/options:

    Option #1: Create a Facebook Group just for your customers/students who have purchased the program for you. This is free.

    Then, simply “Go Live” in the Facebook Group…and either talk on screen, share your slides or share your screen.

    Option #2: A 3rd party software. Again, just for paying customers, they will be able to register and login to watch you live (regardless if you are on screen direct to camera, slides or screencasting).

    While not free like Facebook, here are two recommended services that are the most stable and easy to use to deliver paid trainings:

    GoToWebinar: GoToWebinar is my preferred way to do live webinars. This platform ontinues to be the gold standard. There have been competitors that have hit the market, but I prefer GoToWebinar.

    Zoom: This is another easy, reliable cloud platform for video and audio conferencing. Originally designed for conference room solutions, zoom now offers webinar solutions as well

    What’s nice about Zoom and GoToWebinar, is they will both easily record your live videos. Then, you can re-use them again in the future.

    While Instagram LIVE and other streaming services are great for marketing/delivering free content, those are not recommended for paid content as you want your paid trainings to only be accessed by paying customers/students.

    PRE-RECORDED:

    Don’t want to teach live? That’s fine!

    Pre-recording is also a great option.

    Some recommended tools for pre-recording:

    ScreenFlow is a option for a Mac.

    Camtasia: is a great option for a PC.

    Then, you will need to deliver your content to your

    customers & students. This can be done a variety of ways…but a highly recommended one is Course Cats. Yes, mild shameless plug but that is a company I’m the co-founder of which is an all-in-one-solution for delivering online courses, workshops and other digital products if you want them to have a home on the web.

    Regardless of whether you plan on going live or pre-recording…if you use your computer you will definitely want an external microphone to ensure an amazing sound.

    Here are our microphone recommendations:

    Third thing to decide on is the STRUCTURE:

    So…how are you going to structure your program? Is it going to be 1-to-1? 1-to-many?

    Let’s break down the most popular and impactful structures for online learning:

    Virtual Coaching: This is the simplest. The least scalable. The most intimate. You and one person face-to-face…online.

    There are numerous ways to do virtual coaching.

    One is to have a pre-agenda (example: Someone sends you what they want to discuss/list of questions) and you hammer them out live and answer additional ones.

    The other is just simply hop on a call, sit back and ask all the questions fired at you.

    While virtual coaching isn’t as scalable, it can be very lucrative (for example: my virtual coaching is $1,000/hour). This can be as simple as a Skype or Zoom session.

    Workshops: The way we define a workshop is a single event. It can be 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, etc. but it is essentially one topic that can be taught over a SINGLE session (live or pre-recorded).

    For example, “everything you need to do to write a book” might be more an online course (below) but a workshop might be “How to outline your book in 1 hour.”

    Think more micro-topics. Workshops can be as creative as you are.

    It might be a live workshop on how to properly stretch your back and quads. It might be a pre-recorded workshop on how to draw 10 different animals. The sky is the limit.

    Lessons: This is an emerging trend that is really nice and can also be live or pre-recorded.

    For example, I just saw an example of virtual baseball lessons. You can have the coach be right there with you on video as you swing at home and offering critiques LIVE.

    OR you can video tape yourself, send it to a coach and he/she will send you feedback, drills, etc.

    Again, anything in person can be done online (as long as it is safe…of course!)

    Classes/Courses: These are the classic multi-module (module is just course speak for chapters…chapters in a book/modules in a course…same thing) online course where you break down a topic into step-by-step instructions.

    It might be a 5-week live course every Friday teaching how to become a karate instructor (and of course, students get access to the recordings). It might a 8-module pre-recorded course on how to become a better poker player.

    This is where bigger topics get broken down into a step-by-step system. This is what I teach in my Create Awesome Online Courses program.

    Weekly or Monthly Subscriptions: These are recurring ongoing subscriptions and another lucrative model.

    For example, subscribe and every week you get a brand new cooking lesson…using 5 ingredients or less done LIVE. Or subscribe and each month we will send you a pre-recorded video with the latest ways of marketing on Instagram for gyms.

    The nice thing about this model is as you record each training, you develop an archive which can be sold to future customers.

    Fourth thing is HOW TO MARKET IT:

    I had someone write in our private Facebook group the other day that they were worried about marketing/asking for money during a crisis especially if their class/product program is considered “non-essential.”

    It’s a great thought and very empathetic, but let’s shift our mindset. Sure, food/shelter/health are top priorities.

    Obviously. But, here are a few things to consider.

    From your end: You need money to survive. Check social media every day now and you will see people saying they can’t work or their job can’t be done virtually, etc. You cannot be afraid of asking for money. And realize you aren’t offering a scam/something sketch…you are HELPING PEOPLE. That’s the win-win of online teaching…you are teaching people, they are learning and implementing.

    • When it comes to your customers/students, let’s just call it like it is:
    • People are home and looking for things to do
    • People are looking pursue new passions and hobbies
    • People are looking to continue with old passions and hobbies
    • People are looking for online opportunities
    • People spend money on the essentials but they also spend money

    on MANY other things.*

    *Let me give you an interesting example here: Slow pitch softball bats. Yes, seriously. One of my big hobbies (ahem…obsessions) is slow pitch softball. On Facebook, I’m in numerous groups for buying and selling of softball bats.

    You would think with “everything that is going on right now” that this would slow to a crawl. Nobody would be buying bats now, right? WRONG. The pages are hotter than ever. New releases getting eaten up like….errr something that gets eaten up. Sold out. etc.

    And fun fact, softball players aren’t exactly Bill Gates and his friends. These are every day salt-of-the-earth people. The point is people buy for different reasons…even during difficult times. Comfort. Passion. Opportunity. To make things feel normal. Curiosity. Ambition. Even, fear (although that’s my personal least favorite).

    When it comes to marketing RIGHT NOW it’s all about simplicity. When creating an offer:

    #1: First of all do an audit of your assets to reach to your target market online. What do you have? Example: Email list, blog, website, YouTube channel, Instagram, Facebook, etc. You don’t need a million things here, just know you need SOME WAY to reach your market. And fun fact…people have built 7-figure-plus online learning businesses just from Facebook.

    #2: Tone. When in a crisis our tone is different. It’s MORE understanding. It’s MORE empathetic. It’s MORE human. We should really be like this all the time…but I digress. So in everything you do (your copy, your marketing, etc.) remember this tone. Acknowledge the crazy world and crisis right now. Mention that more people are looking to learn than ever. And come from a place of genuinely wanting to help people.*

    *NOTE: If you don’t genuinely want to help people teaching is NOT for you.

    #3: Keep it simple and get your offer out there. Email your email list. Put up posts on Facebook. Maybe even record a video and give people a taste of what you are offering. Pop it up on Instagram. The worst thing you can do is keep it a secret. Let everyone know what you are offering, when it takes place and how to sign up. We live in a social-media driven society, even if the person who sees it isn’t the perfect customer they might have a friend/cousin/colleague/puppy who is.

    One ‘secret’ nobody talks about when it comes to marketing is consistency. Meaning, consistent marketing (getting the message out, etc.) is the key to long term success in this business (vs. a flash in the pan). As you gain experience, you will develop the skills of being able to feature students results, run specials, learn to leverage things like ads, PR, etc. But one step at a time…the first goal is to get your first customers in.

    Next steps and further help:

    This guide comes from a place of wanting to help. And we have seen, over the last 11 years, thousands of people across the globe become successful at teaching online. If you are looking for further help and resources here are some of the ways we can help you:

    Course Cats: A complete website solution for selling digital courses, trainings and programs. Everything you need from sales pages to order forms to a place actually house your trainings. Comes with a full-featured SIXTY day free trial. 

    Conversion Cats: If you are looking to create your personal brand online and share your expertise with the world, take a look at Conversion Cats which includes a full website template, landing pages and more all optimized for personal brands, influencers and experts.

    Create Awesome Online Courses: If you want to create an online course (and build your online audience) look no further than our flagship program with over 6,000 students in 100 countries who have built successful courses on every topic imaginable from baby sleep training to clarinet lessons for adults.

    Rise Inner Circle: Monthly “what’s working now” training in the digital product and online teaching space. Each month we bring in experts to teach a valuable step-by-step training. Plus, you get access to a vibrant Facebook community of “Inner Circlers.”

    Additional Workshops: From Facebook Ads to building an audience and numerous other topics, browse our library of step-by-step workshops.

    Yes, it is a scary time right now. Yes, there is a lot of uncertainly. And yes, there is an amazing opportunity. Together we will get through this and come out thriving.

    We are here to help.

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    Office 365 Is Now Microsoft 365 What It Means for You and Your Family https://www.paulhelmick.com/office-365-is-now-microsoft-365-what-it-means-for-you-and-your-family/ Sat, 25 Apr 2020 14:31:53 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40608 Office 365 Is Now Microsoft 365 What It Means for You and Your Family
    • As of April Office 365 will be known as Microsoft 365.
    • Office 365 was available in two plans for home users: Office 365 Personal and Office 365 Home
    • Now Office 365 Personal has become Microsoft 365 Personal, for one user, and costs $6.99/month
    • Office 365 Home was rebranded as Microsoft 365 Family, allows 6 users and costs $9.99 per month
    • Both include Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook on both Windows and Mac and the Web
    • For Windows local users only, you also get Access Database and Publisher
    • You also get  1TB of OneDrive cloud storage and 60 minutes of Skype credit every month.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    • As of April Office 365 will be known as Microsoft 365.
    • Office 365 was available in two plans for home users: Office 365 Personal and Office 365 Home
    • Now Office 365 Personal has become Microsoft 365 Personal, for one user, and costs $6.99/month
    • Office 365 Home was rebranded as Microsoft 365 Family, allows 6 users and costs $9.99 per month
    • Both include Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook on both Windows and Mac and the Web
    • For Windows local users only, you also get Access Database and Publisher
    • You also get  1TB of OneDrive cloud storage and 60 minutes of Skype credit every month.

    Via: https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/office-365-now-microsoft-365/

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    Nine Key Sales Pipeline Metrics for Healthy Sales https://www.paulhelmick.com/nine-key-sales-pipeline-metrics-for-healthy-sales/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 15:55:46 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40573 Nine Key Sales Pipeline Metrics for Healthy Sales
    • Every salesperson wants a healthy pipeline, but many don’t have a reliable way to quantify it well
    • By using hard numbers at every stage of the pipeline, salespeople are able to see not only where the bottlenecks are but also what’s causing them
    • MarketingProfs shares these nine key sales pipeline metrics—and their formulas—to uncover insights that help you optimize your sales process, streamline your sales funnel, and maximize your resources.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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  • Every salesperson wants a healthy pipeline, but many don’t have a reliable way to quantify it well
  • By using hard numbers at every stage of the pipeline, salespeople are able to see not only where the bottlenecks are but also what’s causing them
  • MarketingProfs shares these nine key sales pipeline metrics—and their formulas—to uncover insights that help you optimize your sales process, streamline your sales funnel, and maximize your resources.
  • 200414-sales-pipeline-metrics-infographic

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    40573
    Task Inflation in Email – The Unexpected Side Effects of Enforced Telework https://www.paulhelmick.com/task-inflation-in-email-the-unexpected-side-effects-of-enforced-telework/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 15:30:43 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40555 Task Inflation in Email – The Unexpected Side Effects of Enforced Telework
    • From Cal Newport – who has spent years studying how knowledge work operates
    • We tend treat the assignment of work tasks with great informality, perhaps in passing conversation or a quick email
    • Most managers cannot quantify the load on their team members
    • Most team members cannot enumerate very obligation on their own plate
    • And now, more than ever, we’re covered up with meeting invites and unread emails
    • Email is the single best way to distribute text and attachments to multiple people at once – yet, umnaged it’s inflating our tasks now at a record pace with everyone doing remote work
    • Cal Newport’s blog shares great insights on managing one’s knowledge work and deep work contributions in distracting times.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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  • From Cal Newport – who has spent years studying how knowledge work operates
  • We tend treat the assignment of work tasks with great informality, perhaps in passing conversation or a quick email
  • Most managers cannot quantify the load on their team members
  • Most team members cannot enumerate very obligation on their own plate
  • And now, more than ever, we’re covered up with meeting invites and unread emails
  • Email is the single best way to distribute text and attachments to multiple people at once – yet, umnaged it’s inflating our tasks now at a record pace with everyone doing remote work
  • Cal Newport’s blog shares great insights on managing one’s knowledge work and deep work contributions in distracting times.
  •  

    I’ve spent years studying how knowledge work operates. One thing I’ve noticed about this sector is that it tends to treat the assignment of work tasks with great informality. New obligations arise haphazardly, perhaps in the form of a hastily-composed email or impromptu request during a meeting. If you ask a manager to estimate the current load on each of their team members, they’d likely struggle. If you ask the average knowledge worker to enumerate every obligation currently on their own plate, they’d also likely struggle — the things they need to do exist as a loose assemblage of meeting invites and unread emails.

    What prevents this system from spiraling out of control is often a series of implicit friction sources centered on physical co-location in an office. For example:

    • If I see you in the office acting out the role of someone who is busy, or flustered, or overwhelmed, I’m less likely to put more demands on you.
    • If I encounter you face-to-face on a regular basis, then the social capital at stake when I later ask you to do something via email is amplified.
    • Conference room meetings — though rightly vilified when they become incessant — also provide opportunities for highly efficient in-person encounters in which otherwise ambiguous decisions or tasks can be hashed out on the spot.

    When you suddenly take a workplace, and with little warning, make it entirely remote: you lose these friction sources. This could lead to extreme results.

    In some roles, for example, in the absence of this friction task inflation might become endemic, leading knowledge workers to unexpectedly put in more hours even though they no longer have to commute and are freed from time-consuming business travel obligations.

    This inflation might even collapse into a dismal state I call inbox capture, in which essentially every moment of your workday becomes dedicated to keeping up with email, Slack, and Zoom meetings, with very little work beyond the most logistical and superficial actually accomplished — an incredibly wasteful form of economic activity.

    What’s the solution to this particular issue? Knowledge work organizations might have to finally get more formal about how tasks are identified, assigned, and tracked. This will require inconvenient new rules and systems, but will also, in the long run, probably be a much smarter way to work, even when we can return to our offices.

    More generally, I think this is just one example among many where the sudden disruption that defines our current moment will force us to confront aspects of knowledge work that up until now have been barely functional, and ask: what’s the right way to get this work done?

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    Small-Business Owners Face Recovery Challenges https://www.paulhelmick.com/small-business-owners-face-recovery-challenges/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 15:01:50 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40576 Small-Business Owners Face Recovery Challenges
    • As the global health crisis continues its spread across the U.S., millions are newly unemployed, businesses are shuttering for the foreseeable future and uncertainty is high
    • Hit particularly hard by this crisis are small-business owners, many of whom are far short of the cash they’d need to weather the storm
    • 71 percent of small business owners are worried their businesses will never recoup the losses from this crisis and/or have their revenue / employment levels return to where they were
    • Nearly half (47 percent) of business owners have taken on new debt to keep things moving, and another 34 percent have applied but not been approved for loans
    • Entrepreneur Magazine has several resources on their site to help small businesses navigate the loan programs.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    • As the global health crisis continues its spread across the U.S., millions are newly unemployed, businesses are shuttering for the foreseeable future and uncertainty is high
    • Hit particularly hard by this crisis are small-business owners, many of whom are far short of the cash they’d need to weather the storm
    • 71 percent of small business owners are worried their businesses will never recoup the losses from this crisis and/or have their revenue / employment levels return to where they were
    • Nearly half (47 percent) of business owners have taken on new debt to keep things moving, and another 34 percent have applied but not been approved for loans
    • Entrepreneur Magazine has several resources on their site to help small businesses navigate the loan programs.

    Although loans from the federal government are available to help small-business owners stay afloat, a survey from online loan platform Lending Tree found that people aren’t confident these measures will help them in the long term. In a survey of 1,200 business owners, nearly half have shut down temporarily, and 71 percent are worried their businesses will never recoup the losses from this crisis.

    Nearly half (47 percent) of business owners have taken on new debt to keep things moving, and another 34 percent have applied but not been approved for loans.The infographic below offers more information from the survey.

    If you’re one of the eight in 10 business owners who has “no idea” where to get emergency funding, Entrepreneur’s stimulus coverage is here to help.

     

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    To End this Pandemic We’ll Need a Free Vaccine Worldwide https://www.paulhelmick.com/to-end-this-pandemic-well-need-a-free-vaccine-worldwide/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 15:01:14 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40567 To End this Pandemic We’ll Need a Free Vaccine Worldwide
    • A great article from Time Magazine this week – highlights
    • Until we end COVID-19 transmission across the planet, we are likely to keep getting multiple COVID-19 “waves”— that is, rolling, recurrent outbreaks
    • The likely contours of the next one to two years are now coming into clearer view, most countries are still struggling desperately to put out the initial fire
    • The good news is that the time from “lab to jab” could be as short as 12-18 months, there are now at least 70 COVID-19 vaccines under development
    • The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will help fund factories ready to manufacture seven of the vaccine candidates currently under development, even though only one or two candidates are likely to be successful, a strategy that Bill Gates acknowledges will lead to billions being spent on the abandoned five candidates.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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  • A great article from Time Magazine this week – highlights
  • Until we end COVID-19 transmission across the planet, we are likely to keep getting multiple COVID-19 “waves”— that is, rolling, recurrent outbreaks
  • The likely contours of the next one to two years are now coming into clearer view, most countries are still struggling desperately to put out the initial fire
  • The good news is that the time from “lab to jab” could be as short as 12-18 months, there are now at least 70 COVID-19 vaccines under development
  • The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will help fund factories ready to manufacture seven of the vaccine candidates currently under development, even though only one or two candidates are likely to be successful, a strategy that Bill Gates acknowledges will lead to billions being spent on the abandoned five candidates. Losing a few billion dollars, he argues, is worth it compared to the trillions of dollars being lost economically by COVID-19
  • There’s still a serious risk that rich countries will monopolize the vaccine, leaving poor countries behind
  • To truly put this behind us and not have wave after wave of resurgence it needs to be a global solution that emerges.
  •  

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    What Will Work-Life Balance Look Like After the Pandemic https://www.paulhelmick.com/what-will-work-life-balance-look-like-after-the-pandemic/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 15:01:03 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40558 What Will Work-Life Balance Look Like After the Pandemic
    • The Covid-19 crisis has shoved work and home lives under the same roof for many families
    • The implicit model of an “ideal worker” – one who is wholly devoted to their job and is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, every year of their career – is unrealistic
    • Employees are disproportionally well-compensated for being ideal workers
    • “Time greedy” professions like finance, consulting, and law — where 80- or 100-hour weeks may be typical — compensate their workers per hour more than professions with a regular 40-hour week
    • Flexible-work arrangements come with severe penalties; many who leave the workforce for a period or shift to part-time never recover their professional standing or compensation
    • All of that is likely to forever change and be reshaped coming out of this pandemic
    • Executives and managers have the opportunity to choose quality work over quantity of work.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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    • The Covid-19 crisis has shoved work and home lives under the same roof for many families
    • The implicit model of an “ideal worker” – one who is wholly devoted to their job and is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, every year of their career – is unrealistic
    • Employees are disproportionally well-compensated for being ideal workers
    • “Time greedy” professions like finance, consulting, and law — where 80- or 100-hour weeks may be typical — compensate their workers per hour more than professions with a regular 40-hour week
    • Flexible-work arrangements come with severe penalties; many who leave the workforce for a period or shift to part-time never recover their professional standing or compensation
    • All of that is likely to forever change and be reshaped coming out of this pandemic
    • Executives and managers have the opportunity to choose quality work over quantity of work.

     

    For decades, scholars have described how organizations were built upon the implicit model of an “ideal worker”: one who is wholly devoted to their job and is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, every year of their career. This was an always unrealistic archetype, and the Covid-19 crisis has shown just how unrealistic it is. The authors explain how shifting away from this harmful model will benefit not only working parents but all employees — and lead to better performing organizations.

    Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

    We’ve made our coronavirus coverage free for all readers. To get all of HBR’s content delivered to your inbox, sign up for the Daily Alert newsletter.

    As if being a working parent didn’t already include enough moving pieces to manage, even toddlers are now having standing teleconferences. For the two of us, our daughters’ virtual morning preschool meeting is one more item to be juggled as we attempt to work full-time from home without childcare. Our own conference calls are scheduled for naptime and occasionally interrupted by a request for potty. We attempt to wedge the rest of the workday into the early mornings and post-bedtime.

    The Covid-19 crisis has shoved work and home lives under the same roof for many families like ours, and the struggle to manage it all is now visible to peers and bosses. As people postulate how the country may be forever changed by the pandemic, we can hope that one major shift will be a move away from the harmful assumption that a 24/7 work culture is working well for anyone.

    Further Reading

    For decades, scholars have described how organizations were built upon the implicit model of an “ideal worker”: one who is wholly devoted to their job and is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, every year of their career. This was always an unrealistic archetype, one that presumed a full-time caretaker in the background. Yet today, over two-thirds of American families are headed by single parents or two working parents. With schools and daycares closed, work cannot continue as normal simply because working remotely is technologically possible.

    Employees are disproportionally well-compensated for being ideal workers. “Time greedy” professions like finance, consulting, and law — where 80- or 100-hour weeks may be typical — compensate their workers per hour more than professions with a regular 40-hour week. Flexible-work arrangements come with severe penalties; many who leave the workforce for a period or shift to part-time never recover their professional standing or compensation. When individuals push back — asking for less travel or requesting part-time or flexible hours — their performance reviews suffer and they are less likely to be promoted, studies find. Simply asking for workplace flexibility engenders professional stigma.

    The “ideal worker” expectation is particularly punitive for working mothers, who also typically put in more hours of caregiving work at home than their spouses. Furthermore, men are more likely to “fake it” and pass as ideal workers, while women make clear that they cannot meet these expectations, including by negotiating flexible-work arrangements. Many organizations are not amenable to adjustments, leading to the perception that women are opting out of the workforce — although research suggests women are actually “pushed out.”

    In our world of laptops, cellphones, and teleconferences, the intellectual and analytical tasks of “knowledge workers” can continue at home. But low-wage workers increasingly are subject to similar expectations of responsiveness, even as they have less job security and even less flexibility than higher paid workers. In the midst of this pandemic, store clerks, delivery drivers, and warehouse workers are now forced to be “ideal workers” too, risking exposure to the virus in public with little support for the families they leave to go to work.

    There have been many calls for restructuring how work is done, including making more room for our families and questioning the real value of the eight-hour (or more) workday. Now is a time for companies to step back and reexamine which traditional ways of working exist because of convention, not necessity.

    Executives and managers have the opportunity to choose quality work over quantity of work. They can value the creative ideas that emerge after a midday hike or meditation session, rather than putting in face time at the office. They can stop rewarding the faster response over the better response, or the longer workday over a more productive workday. They can rethink highly competitive career tracks where you make it or wash out — such as giving tenure-track scholars and partner-track lawyers the choice of a longer clock before their evaluation.

    During this pandemic, employers are seeing that workers can’t function well without accommodation for their family responsibilities. Will that lesson last after the crisis is over? American families want greater choices in determining how their work and their families fit together. Post-pandemic, can we create a system that fits real workers, not just idealized ones? If so, we have the opportunity to emerge from this crisis with both healthier employees and better performing organizations.

    If our free content helps you to contend with these challenges, please consider subscribing to HBR. A subscription purchase is the best way to support the creation of these resources.

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    How to Work from Home With Kids https://www.paulhelmick.com/how-to-work-from-home-with-kids/ Sat, 18 Apr 2020 15:00:22 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40300 How to Work from Home With Kids
    • If you’re fortunate enough to have a job that lets you work from home during the coronavirus quarantine, you may be one of the many Americans who is working from home and caring for children at the same time
    • This article shares ten insights to help you turn survival into success.
    • 1/ Talk about the changes with your kids
    • 2/ Be realistic about what success means
    • 3/ Give them structure
    • 4/ Get on the same page with your partner
    • 5/ Take advantage of free educational resources
    • 6/ Self-isolate while in self-isolation
    • 7/ Make a space for the kids
    • 8/ Go outside
    • 9/ Make virtual playdates
    • 10/ Stay positive.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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  • If you’re fortunate enough to have a job that lets you work from home during the coronavirus quarantine, you may be one of the many Americans who is working from home and caring for children at the same time
  • This article shares ten insights to help you turn survival into success.
  • 1/ Talk about the changes with your kids
  • 2/ Be realistic about what success means
  • 3/ Give them structure
  • 4/ Get on the same page with your partner
  • 5/ Take advantage of free educational resources
  • 6/ Self-isolate while in self-isolation
  • 7/ Make a space for the kids
  • 8/ Go outside
  • 9/ Make virtual playdates
  • 10/ Stay positive.
  • See the full article at the link below for more.

    A woman working on her home computer, with two kids and man in background.

     

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    How to use FaceTime for group calls https://www.paulhelmick.com/how-to-use-facetime-for-group-calls/ Fri, 10 Apr 2020 19:53:39 +0000 https://www.paulhelmick.com/?p=40502 How to use FaceTime for group calls
    • If you have an iPhone or MacBook, then you have probably used FaceTime, Apple’s built-in video and voice-calling app.
    • We’ve seen this as a very quick/fast way for leadership teams to stay connected with each other instantly via their mobile phones.
    • Most folks do this 1-1 with friends, but you can you can have up to 32 people on a FaceTime call, so it’s a good video-chatting option if you don’t want to download another app to have a group video call — as long as you and your friends all have Apple devices.

    -> Read More at PaulHelmick.com

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  • If you have an iPhone or MacBook, then you have probably used FaceTime, Apple’s built-in video and voice-calling app.
  • We’ve seen this as a very quick/fast way for leadership teams to stay connected with each other instantly via their mobile phones.
  • Most folks do this 1-1 with friends, but you can you can have up to 32 people on a FaceTime call, so it’s a good video-chatting option if you don’t want to download another app to have a group video call — as long as you and your friends all have Apple devices.
  • Look at the full article below for step by step directions on how to add a second, third, fourth person to your call group.

     

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